National Treasure
 

National Treasure (2004)

 

Concept featured in film:Observation

Location of clip: DVD: Chapter 11: The Ocular Device and then Chapter 14: Making a Deal with Ian

 


Play Flickclip Here

Summary of clip: Chapter 11: Ben finds an ocular device that allows him to 'see' an encryption on the back of the Declaration of Independence. What he sees isn't all there is to be found because he doesn't take the time to use all the lenses of the spectacles. Later in Chapter 14: Ben 'sees' there was more to the encrypted map by using the spectacles multiple lenses to observe more closely the map on the Declaration which leads him to the National Treasure.

Connection of flickclip to the concept: These flickclip scenes allow us to see that observation is very important. Without thorough observation one may not catch everything the first time through, thus multiple tests and experiments are needed to ensue that what you are observing is in fact the genuine answer that is exact and accurate.

Suggestions to Teachers:

1. Discuss with students what types of observation there are.

2. Some questions to get students to relate observation to them: How important is observation in your life? To a scientist?

3. While watching Chapter 11 have students study the spectacles and describe thoroughly what Ben is able to see on the Back of the Declaration of Independence. Remind them, this is an observation activity so less is not more in this case.

4. Have a discussion on if they think Ben used the spectacles to their full potential? Do they think he saw everything he was supposed to see? What do they think he could have done differently?

5. While watching Chapter 14 have students take notes again on what Ben does with the spectacles and how he is able to see something different this time. Once again have them thoroughly describe what is on the back of the Declaration of Independence.

6. Discuss what Ben missed the first time and how important that information was to finding the National Treasure.

7. Ask students again how important are observations to science? Without thorough observation one may not catch everything the first time through, thus multiple tests and experiments are needed to ensue that what you are observing is in fact the genuine answer that is exact and accurate.